h1

Idaho Speech & Debate Rules & Regulations

IHSAA Rules & Regulations

Speech

Use of Materials

1. Material presented by all contestants shall be appropriate for competition and public performance by high school students. A signed Principal’s Approval Form must be submitted to both district and state tournament managers to verify the principal’s approval of all material presented by his/her students.

2. Materials and/or presentations may not be significantly altered from round to round or from district to state.

3. Contestants may not use any material that they have competitively performed in previous years’ district or state competition.

4. Materials previously performed at district or state tournaments in the current school year shall not be used by that same student in a second district or state tournament.

Grounds for Disqualification

Grounds for disqualification from an event:

1. Violation of event rules

2. One or more rounds of “no-show”

3. Violation of “use of materials” rules above

Note: Judges do not disqualify competitors. Violations shall be reported to the tournament manager.

Timing Regulations

1. Timing violations in preliminary rounds of all speech events will result in being dropped one rank. There are no “grace periods” of time.

2. Timing penalties are not given in semi-finals and finals at State Speech in After Dinner Speaking or Interp events.

3. The judge is the official timekeeper.

4. Time signals are provided by the judge in Panel Discussion, Impromptu, Extemporaneous, and Retold Story only.

General Rules – Speech Events

1. Costumes and/or human assistance are not permitted in any speech event, including draw preparation.

2. Visual /audio aids are permitted only in Salesmanship and Expository Speech.

3. Contestants shall receive no outside assistance once the round has started. In draw events, contestants shall receive no assistance during preparation time.

4. The use of real weapons, facsimiles thereof, or look-alikes is prohibited.

5. The total time of singing in any speech is not to exceed one minute.

Group A Events

Duo Interpretation

Time: 10 min. maximumTime signals: not provided

This event follows rules set forth by the National Forensic League. Presentations will be from memory and without the use of physical objects or costumes. Selection must be a cutting from a single work of literature: one novel, one short story, one play, or one poem. Recorded material that is not printed and published is prohibited. Each of the two performers may play one or more characters so long as performance responsibility remains as balanced as possible. If the selection is prose or poetry and contains narration, either or both of the performers may present the narration. During the presentation, the team must name the author and the book or magazine from which the cutting was made. Focus may be direct (performers may look at each other) during the introduction, but must be indirect (off stage) during the performance itself.

Expository Speech

Time: 7 min. maximumTime signals: not provided

An expository speech is an informative speech that explains an idea, process, or theory. It may be delivered with or without the use of a 4 x 6 note card. Visual and/or audio aids are permitted. Visual aids may not include an outline of the speech, and any labeling and/or titling should be concise and assist in the demonstration of the idea, process, or theory.

Extemporaneous Speaking

Time: 7 min. maximumTime signals: provided

Draw Event Topics selected/prepared in draw room

Topics will be chosen from those provided by the NFHS during the three months prior to State. Each contestant draws three topics and selects one. He/she will have 30 minutes to prepare, and may use an index and research periodicals during this time. Resource materials will not be provided by the tournament. During the presentation, the contestant may use a 4 x 6 note card written on one side. The topic will be handed to the judge before the contestant speaks and returned to the tab room by the judge at the conclusion of the round. The speech should be a synthesis of fact and opinion on the topic – not a memory test of any particular magazine.

Panel Discussion

Time: 40 min. roundTime penalties: not assessed

2012 Panel Discussion Topics: Five topics will be chosen at the fall ISATA conference and posted on the IHSAA website.

Event Procedure: Panel members do not make formal speeches, but remain seated and discuss the topic informally. Prepared notes or materials are not allowed, but notes may be taken during the discussion. Emphasis is on problem solving through group consensus. Panelists should be familiar with the topic and be prepared to discuss facts and opinions. Panel competitors may only bring a pen or pencil to the round. The judge will hand each competitor a blank sheet of paper as he/she enters the room.

Selection of Topics: At the state tournament, each topic will be used once. A blind draw at the beginning of the tournament will determine which topics are used for all preliminary rounds as well as the semifinal and final rounds.

Radio/Broadcast Journalism

Time: 5:30-6:00 minutesTime signals; not providedDraw EventMaterial prepared in draw room

All contestants use the same material provided by the tournament management. The contestant is allowed a 30 minute period to prepare a news broadcast from the material provided. This speech must include a minimum of three pieces of news The speech shall be a news broadcast with an original commercial of no fewer than 30 seconds and an editorial commentary about a news item covered in the provided material. The editorial commentary, which shall be an original extemporaneous editorial reflecting the opinion of the contestant on a news story used in the presentation shall consume between 1-2 minutes of the total speech and shall be presented in the last half of the broadcast. Students shall enter the room one at a time while other contestants wait outside.Contestants shall sit with their back toward the judge.

Emphasis should be placed on presentation of the news stories, commercial and editorial commentary. Note this is not an interpretation event. Contestants may time themselves, but may not have another person assist with timing.

Retold Story

Time: 6 min. maximumTime signals: provided

Draw EventStories selected/prepared in draw room

Contestants will select a story from a group of three elementary level books provided by the tournament and in 30 minutes, be prepared to retell the story as if they are presenting in front of an elementary-age audience. The story shall be retold without notes, but must not be memorized. The same book may be presented only once by a contestant.

Retold Event Procedure: Contestants will enter the round in staggered intervals and will hand the selected book to the judge before starting his/her presentation. Note: The judge will return books to the tab room after each round, but will not read each book while contestant is retelling the story.

Congressional Speaking

The state tournament will use judge rankings and parliamentarian rankings to advance the top 1/3 of competitors out of three preliminary sessions to a super congress session. The district tournaments may adjust the schedule as necessary. The super session will run during both the semi and final rounds. All houses (sections) are to remain seated for the three preliminary rounds. At the beginning of session 1, each house will take the oath of office and elect the Presiding Officers for the chamber. Each house is to have a new judge each preliminary session and a panel of three judges for the duration of the super session. The assigned parliamentarians are to be assigned to the same house for the duration of the preliminary sessions with one of them being randomly selected to be the parliamentarian for the super session.

Judging

The judge is to rank the top 8 speakers in the chamber, with 1 being best (all others are automatically ranked at 9) and score each speech on a scale of 1-6, (6 being best). The three judges’ rankings for the preliminary sessions will advance the top 1/3 to the super congress session. The parliamentarian is to rank all students in the house from 1 to 30 to be used as a tie breaker. The speech scores may be used as a basis for the judge/parliamentarian rankings but they play no role in advancement. The rubric for scoring speeches will follow the NFL’s congress rubric. Robert’s Rules of Order are to be the procedural guidelines with recency and precedent resetting after each preliminary session.

Legislation

The district tournament may use student-generated legislation which follows the NFL’s formatting guidelines (1 per student) along with the NFL’s previous year’s Alpha national packet. The state tournament is to use the NFL’s previous year’s semifinals legislation packet. Students are responsible for providing 30 copies for their authored/sponsored legislation for districts. All students are to provide their own printed copy of the NFL’s legislation packets at both district and state tournaments.

Group B Events

After Dinner Speaking

Time: 4 – 6 minutesTime signals: not provided

This event should imitate a banquet situation. The group (real or fictional) being addressed should be clear. The intent of ADS is to entertain, but the speaker must also develop an idea. Material presented must be original. Delivery may be through memorization or use of notes on one side of a 4 x 6 card, but a text may not be used. Emphasis should be placed on the concept of “speech”. While humorous quips and jokes are appropriate, they must have purpose and fit the occasion.

Humorous / Serious Interpretation

Time: 10 min. maximumTime signals: not provided

A serious or humorous program using material from one or more pieces of prose, poetry, or drama. Selections may be read from a text or memorized. Materials must be from a printed or published source with an ISBN number. An original source without an ISBN number may be used provided it is published and available at the tournament. Recordings or videos may not be used as the source. Props, makeup, and costumes are not permitted. The contestants should be evaluated on poise, quality and use of voice, physical expression and especially the ability to interpret characters correctly and consistently. This allows full body movement (bending, kneeling, turning).

Impromptu Speaking

Time: 2 – 4 minutesTime signals: provided

Draw EventTopics drawn/prepared in contest room

Contestants will draw three topics, choose one, and may use 60 seconds preparation time. The contestant may take notes during the preparation time, but may not refer to the notes during the presentation. Topics will be news items for one round, abstract words for one round, and quotations for one round. In semi and final rounds the contestant will receive one news item, one quotation, and one abstract word.

Oratorical Analysis

Time: 10 min. maximumTime signals: not provided

The contestant will present a non-original speech, portions thereof, or cuttings of various speeches by one “real life” speaker. The intent of this event should be the analysis (not interpretation) of the oratory or speech. The speech should not be from fiction, but from an actual address by a person of significance either past or present. The contestant will analyze the oratory selection(s) for approximately 50% of the presentation. The speech may be presented from memory or by use of a text.

Original Oratory

Time: 10 min. maximumTime signals: not provided

This is an original, memorized persuasive speech. A maximum of 150 words of quoted material may be used in the oration. The purpose of original oratory is to persuade in order to accomplish a response of feeling, belief, or action.

Salesmanship

Time: 3-7 minutes + 2 min. questioning by judge only

Time signals: not provided

The purpose of this event is to sell a singular, legitimate product and may include variations of that product. Contestant must identify brand. “Services” are not considered legitimate products. The actual product (not a model) must be displayed and/or demonstrated. Presentation may be memorized. Notes on one side of a 4 x 6 card may be used, but texts are not permitted. Video /audio aids are optional. In order to demonstrate the function of a product, that product may be put on as the demonstration begins and then removed following the demonstration. The contestant may not wear the product into the room, nor leave it on once the demonstration of that product is concluded. Additional items of clothing that might serve to enhance the visual effect of the product are considered costuming and are prohibited.

Judging Procedures for State Speech

1. Oral critiques are not given at State.

2. Competitors will receive two scores:

Rank -Contestants in each section of each round will be ranked 1,2,3,4,4,4,etc., with 1 going to the best entry. There can be only one 1st, one 2nd and one 3rd in a section. All remaining entries are ranked 4th.

Rate – Entries are rated Superior, Excellent, Average, or Below Average according to performance quality.

a. Ratings may be given to more than one entry.

b. The rating of “below average” is not used at State

c. In the semi-final and final rounds at state speech, no rating below “6” will be given.

Rating Scale

Superior Excellent Average Below Ave.

10 9 8 7 6 5 4

Determining Advancement at State Speech

1. Semi-Finals

a. The top 14 speakers from preliminary rounds will be selected by rank totals. To accommodate ties, contestants will advance on the first natural break occurring in this order: 14, 16, 15, 13.

b. Two semi-final sections will be set by dividing the power based on the first three rounds rank totals and then rating totals as needed.

2. Finals

a. The top three speakers in each of the semi-final rounds will advance to the final round. Selection will be based on: 1) rank totals, 2) rating totals, 3) judge preference in the semi-final round. (#2 and #3 will be used in case of ties.)

b. Final round results will be based on: 1) rank totals, 2) rating totals, 3) judge preference, 4) semifinal rank totals (prior to cumulative), and 5) preliminary rounds rank totals (prelim cumulative). (#4 and #5 will be used in case of ties.)

Determining Team Champions

1. Team winners in Class A and Class B are determined by the total combined points in event place finish. Points listed are the maximum possible for the placement.

1st place 5 points finalist 2 points

2nd place 4 points semi-finalist 1 point

3rd place 3 points

2. A tie for team winners will be broken by:

a. largest number of entries breaking to finals

b. largest number of first place finishers

Season Tournament Limitations

1. A school or individual may compete in up to ten tournaments for both speech and debate (ex. 3 debate only, 5 speech/debate combined, and 2 speech only). A tournament is defined as four or more schools.

2. No individual may miss more than eight days of school to attend tournaments.

3. Any tournament entered by an individual will count as one of the school’s allowed tournaments.

4. Any school or individual exceeding the allowed number of tournaments will be ineligible for district and state tournaments.

State Speech Representation

1. No more than the top 1/3, or any fraction thereof, of the entries that complete all rounds in an event at district speech will advance to State, provided each qualifier has an excellent or superior rating.

2. State qualifiers will be determined by a cumulative two or three-round ranking and rating. If a tie exists in the last qualifying position, both entries may advance.

3. Honest Effort: If a student does not finish all rounds at District, he/she may be included in the count used to determine the number of state qualifiers provided the tournament manager determines that the non-finish was due to emergency circumstances beyond the student’s control.

District-to-state Representation

1-3 = 1 qualifier 16-18 = 6 qualifiers

4-6 = 2 qualifiers 19-21 = 7 qualifiers

7-9 = 3 qualifiers 22-24 = 8 qualifiers

10-12 = 4 qualifiers 25-27 = 9 qualifiers

13-15 = 5 qualifiers 28-30 = 10 qualifiers

Alternates

1. Alternates shall be determined at the district tournament. Each district may designate and list up to two official alternates for each event, provided they received a superior or excellent rating at the district tournament.

2. In the event a qualifying entry cannot attend State, the official district alternate(s) will be entered. Alternates do not receive redraw rights.

3. Alternates will not be entered if the number of district qualifiers exceeds representation due to ties in the last qualifying position.

4. Drops shall be reported to the IHSAA and changed on the “Joy of Tournaments” website by noon on the Wednesday preceding State. Drops reported after that time will result in a fine being levied against the school (see speech arts general regulations).

5. Alternates replacing late drops will be entered up to the start of the first round at State. First choice will be the alternates from the district reporting the drop. If that alternate is not available, another will be randomly selected from a pool of available district alternates.

6. Schools choosing to bring official district alternates to the state tournament must register them upon arrival at the tournament site.

Entry Limitations – District & State

1. At district and state tournaments, students may enter two events: one from Group A and one from Group B.

2. At district tournaments, schools may enter up to four entries per event.

3. In Congressional Speaking, schools may enter up to eight students in the district tournament.

State Speech Tournament Regulations

1. All rounds at State Speech are open to observers.

2. Contestants will compete in three preliminary rounds with one judge for each section.

3. Contestants will be placed into sections of 5–8 for each preliminary round. The following sectioning priorities should be followed to the extent possible:

a. No school should have its students competing against each other in the same section of an event.

b. Contestants should compete against different opponents each round.

c. The speaking order should rotate each round.

d. Judges should not judge the same event or same contestant twice. Judges should not judge entries from their own school.

4. A prepared text (not an outline) for Expository, Original Oratory, After Dinner, Salesmanship, and Oratorical Analysis, Radio, and photocopies of Interp. event materials must be on file with district and state managers. Failure to provide required materials will result in disqualification. District managers are required to collect all scripts and take them to state speech.

5. Students who arrive late to a round and speak out of turn will be dropped one rank, unless written permission is obtained from the tournament manager.

Debate

Season Tournament Limitations

  1. A school or individual may compete in up to ten tournaments for both speech and debate (ex. 3 debate only, 5 speech/debate combined, and 2 speech only). A tournament is defined as four or more schools.

2. No debater may miss more than eight days of school to attend tournaments.

3. Any tournament entered by a debater will count as one of the school’s allowed tournaments.

4. Any school or individual exceeding the allowed number of tournaments (exception: NFL) will be ineligible for district and state tournaments.

State Debate Representation

1. Representation from district to state shall be based on the actual number of entries that complete all rounds of the district tournament.

2. Representation quotas for state debate:

Dist Entries# to StateDist Entries# to State

3 – 6 2 19 – 24 8

7 – 12 4 25 – 30 10

13 – 18 6 31 – 36 12

3. Honest Effort: If an entry does not complete all rounds at the district tournament, that entry may be included in the count used to determine the number of state qualifiers provided the tournament manager determines that the non-finish was due to emergency circumstances beyond the student’s control.

Alternates

1. Alternates shall be determined at the district tournament, in the manner approved by the District Board of Control. Each district may designate two official alternates for each event. In the event a qualifying entry cannot attend State, the official district alternate entry will be entered. Note: Alternates do not receive repair rights.

2. Drops shall be reported to the IHSAA and changed on the “Joy of Tournaments” website by noon on the Wednesday preceding State. Drops reported after that time will result in a fine being levied against the school (see speech arts general regulations).

3. Alternates replacing late drops will be entered up to the start of the first round at State. First choice will be the alternates from the district reporting the drop. If that alternate is not available, another will be randomly selected from a pool of available district alternates, first from the #1 alternates’ pool and then from the #2 alternates’ pool.

4. Schools choosing to bring official district alternates to the state tournament must register them upon arrival at the tournament site.

POLICY DEBATE

1. Policy debate, also known as team debate, is a series of contention-quote-analysis organized argumentation between two teams of two members each. The debate is like a trial, but an idea or proposal is being tried rather than a person.

2. There are two sides to a debate – affirmative which attempts to show something is wrong with the present system (status quo) and thus a change is needed, and negative which usually takes the position that the present system is acceptable, that no problem exists to an extent that warrants or justifies a change.

3. It is the obligation of the affirmative to debate the topic and offer reasonable solutions. The negative usually argues that the status quo is proven to be workable and that a minor change may be all that is needed. (Negative mayuse a counter plan.)

4. The affirmative team should sit on the judge’s left and the negative on the judge’s right, whenever possible.

Time Limits for Policy Debate

8 minutes constructive speeches

3 minutes cross-examination

5 minutes rebuttal

5 minutes down time

2011-2012 Policy Debate Topic

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its exploration and/or development of space beyond the Earth’s mesosphere.

 

LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATE

1. Lincoln-Douglas debate is a “one-on-one” argumentation where the debaters attempt to convince the judge of the acceptability of their side of a proposition of value. A proposition of value is a statement about the qualities we assign to a given object as something we are favorable toward, or the opposite, as something we are not favorable toward. Value resolutions take several forms:

a. Moral value resolutions – state that something is good or bad in an ethical sense.

b. Artistic value resolutions – state that something is pleasing or displeasing to our senses.

c. Political value resolutions – state preferences in political philosophies.

Some Lincoln-Douglas debate propositions are worded to offer two conflicting values while some L-D propositions regard the acceptability of a single value.

2. Format: Each speaker in the debate has an equal amount of time to persuade the judge.

3. Duties of the Speakers

a. The Affirmative speaker is required to uphold an analysis of the value(s) implied in the resolution.

b. The Negative speaker may choose:

1. To uphold a countervailing analysis of the value(s) implied in the resolution OR

2. To offer a straight refutation of the Affirmative position OR

3. To offer a combination of counter analysis and refutation.

c. Both speakers bear the burden of clash in rebuttal speeches; that is, each must speak to his/her opponent’s position in the debate.

4. The affirmative should sit on the judge’s left and the negative on the judge’s right, whenever possible.

Time Limits for Lincoln-Douglas Debate

6 minutes affirmative constructive speeches

3 minutes cross-examination by negative

7 minutes negative constructive speeches

3 minutes cross-examination by affirmative

4 minutes affirmative rebuttal

6 minutes negative rebuttal

3 minutes affirmative rebuttal

3 minutes down time

Lincoln-Douglas Debate Topics

1. The district Lincoln-Douglas topic is published in the December issue of the NFL Rostrum.

2. The state Lincoln-Douglas topic is published in the February issue of the NFL Rostrum.

3. The state L-D topic shall not be debated nor observed at any tournament prior to the state tournament.

 

PUBLIC FORUM DEBATE

(Adopted from the NFL)

Public Forum Debate is audience friendly debate that focuses on advocacy of a position derived from the issues presented in the resolution, not a prescribed set of burdens. A Public Forum Debate round begins with a flip of a coin between the competing teams to determine sides and speaker position. Public Forum tests skills in argumentation, cross-examination, and refutation.

1. Topics: Specific topics for district and state tournaments will be published in the Rostrum and at www.nflonline.org.

2. Procedure: Prior to EVERY round and in the presence of the judge(s), a coin is tossed by one team and called by the other team. The team that wins the flip may choose one of two options: EITHER the SIDE of the topic they wish to defend (pro or con) OR the SPEAKING POSITION they wish to have (begin the debate or end the debate). The remaining option (SIDE OR SPEAKING POSITION) is the choice of the team that loses the flip. Once speaking positions and sides have been determined, the debate can begin. Each speaker shall have four minutes for constructive argument, alternating between pro and con. (Please keep in mind that the debate may begin with a con speech.) Following the first two constructive speeches, the two debaters who have just given speeches will stand and participate in a three-minute “crossfire”. [In “crossfire” both debaters “hold the floor”] However, the first question must be asked by the speaker who spoke first. After that question, either debater may question and/or answer at will.] At the end of the first “crossfire”, the four-minute constructive arguments are continued by the students yet to speak. At the conclusion of the last two constructive arguments, another three-minute “crossfire” takes place between the two debaters who just spoke using the crossfire procedure discussed above. Following the four constructive speeches and two “crossfire” segments, the 1st speakers for each team will each give a 2-minute summary continuing established alternation. At the conclusion of the summary speeches, all four debaters will remain seated and participate in a three-minute “Grand Crossfire” in which all four debaters are allowed to cross-examine one another. The first question must be asked by the speaker who gave the first summary speech. At the conclusion of the “Grand Crossfire”, the second speakers will each give a 2-minute “Final Focus” speech. The “Final Focus” is a persuasive final restatement of why a team has won the debate.

Public Forum Timing Schedule

First Speaker – Team A = 4 Minutes

First Speaker – Team B = 4 Minutes

Crossfire = 3 Minutes

Second Speaker – Team A = 4 Minutes

Second Speaker – Team B = 4 Minutes

Crossfire = 3 Minutes

Summary – First Speaker – Team A = 2 Minutes

Summary – First Speaker – Team B = 2 Minutes

Grand Crossfire = 3 Minutes

Final Focus – Second Speaker – Team A = 2 Minutes

Final Focus – Second Speaker – Team B = 2 Minutes

Prep Time (per team) = 2 Minutes

3. Plans/Counterplans: In Public Forum Debate, a plan or counterplan is defined by the NFL as a formalized, comprehensive proposal for implementation. Neither the pro or con side is permitted to offer a plan or counterplan; rather, they should offer reasoning to support a position of advocacy. Debaters may offer generalized, practical solutions.

Public Forum Debate Topics

1. The district Public Forum topic is published in the January issue of the NFL Rostrum.

2. The state Public Forum topic is published in the February issue of the NFL Rostrum.

3. The state Public Forum topic shall not be debated nor observed at any tournament prior to the state tournament.

IDAHO DEBATE CODE

Purpose

The IDC is to clarify debate rules and format and is specifically applied to district and state tournaments. It may also serve as a guide for the invitational season. Violations of IDC rules could result in loss of the ballot or disqualification. All grievances shall be made in good faith. Grievances made without substantial proof of violations will not be investigated.

General

Scouting

There shall be no scouting by a coach, judge, observer or contestant in order to obtain advance information of an opponent’s case.

Prior to break rounds, observers must be affiliated with one of the participating schools or obtain permission from the tournament manager. There shall be no heckling or distractions of the debaters.

There will be no flowing of rounds by observers.

Contestants shall receive no outside assistance once the round has begun.

Timing

The judge is ultimately responsible for all times in the round.

The judge may designate a ‘Time Keeper’ for this purpose.

Debaters may time themselves in order to stay within allotted times.

A ‘Road Map’ is included in the speakers allotted time.

Miscellaneous

Laptops are allowed in debate; provided that wireless connectivity is deactivated.

Permission to record a debate must be obtained from all coaches and debaters involved.

New issues shall not be advanced in rebuttal speeches; however, additional evidence and extensions on previous arguments are appropriate.

Policy Debate

Procedure

A five-minute preparation time is allotted for each policy team to be used at their discretion, except during speeches.

The first affirmative must define the terms of the proposition either literally or operationally. The first negative may either accept or reject the definition of terms. Any topicality arguments must be initiated in the first negative constructive speech.

The affirmative must present the plan, or a reasonable outline, during the first affirmative constructive speech.

In a counter plan case, or where a specific minor repair is advanced by the negative, the negative must present the proposal during the first negative constructive speech. The negative must not implement the resolution advanced by the affirmative.

Evidence

It is illegal to falsify evidence.

Evidence must be identified in writing by author, title, date of publication and page number. Verbal reference can be abbreviated.

Any evidence used in round must be available for inspection by the opposition or judge.

Analytical arguments do not require evidence.

Analytical arguments are arguments based on logical reasoning, metaphor or common knowledge.

The judge determines whether an argument meets the above standard.

Cross Examination (C-X)

Each speaker on a team must ask questions. The team may determine the order in which each team member asks questions.

The witness must answer any legitimate question to which an answer can be given.

The witness shall not ask questions of the questioner except for the purpose of clarification.

Where appropriate, the witness may clarify his or her answer.

The questioner controls the time, and may interrupt the witness to request shorter answers or indicate that the answer given is sufficient.

Tag-Teaming

Tag-teaming is forbidden.

During cross examination, constructive and rebuttal speeches, the speaker’s partner may not verbally assist or interrupt.

During C-X, the witness must answer without consultation, or instruction from his/her colleague, whether written, verbal or otherwise.

Lincoln-Douglas Debate

Procedure

A three-minute preparation time is allotted each L-D debater to be used at their discretion except during speeches.

The first affirmative speech must define the terms of the proposition either literally or operationally. The first negative speech may either accept or reject the definition of terms. Any topicality arguments must be initiated in the first negative constructive speech.

Evidence

It is illegal to falsify evidence.

Evidence must be identified in writing by author, title, date of publication and page number. Verbal reference can be abbreviated.

Any evidence used in round must be available for inspection by the opposition or judge.

As philosophical arguments can be exceptionally complicated, paraphrasing of philosophical positions is acceptable.

Analytical arguments do not require evidence.

Analytical arguments are arguments based on logical reasoning, metaphor or common knowledge.

The judge determines whether an argument meets the above standard.

Cross Examination (C-X)

The witness must answer any legitimate question to which an answer can be given.

The witness shall not ask questions of the questioner except for the purpose of clarification.

Where appropriate, the witness may clarify his or her answer.

The questioner controls the time, and may interrupt the witness to request shorter answers or indicate that the answer given is sufficient.

Public Forum Debate

Procedure

Teams will follow established rules for selecting speaking order and topic side.

Every round is flip for sides.

A 2 minute preparation time is allotted each team to be used at their discretion except during speeches.

Evidence

Public-Forum debate is designed as ‘common man’ debate, as such analytic and paraphrased arguments are acceptable.

Analytical arguments are arguments based on logical reasoning, metaphor or common knowledge.

Paraphrased arguments reference information without implying an exact quotation.

Debaters referencing ‘specific’ evidence:

It is illegal to falsify evidence.

Any evidence used in round must be available for inspection by the opposition or judge.

Evidence must be identified in writing by author, title, date of publication and page number. Verbal reference can be abbreviated

The judge has the sole responsibility to determine which arguments persuade them, there is no implied hierarchy of importance between argument types.

Cross Fire (C-X)

Public Forum debate has shared cross examinations.

Participants are expected to share time and respond to all valid queries.

Where appropriate, the witness may clarify his or her answer.

Tag-Teaming

Tag-teaming is forbidden.

During cross fire, constructive and rebuttal speeches, the speaker’s partner may not verbally assist or interrupt.

During cross fire, the witness must answer without consultation, or instruction from his/her colleague, whether written, verbal or otherwise.

During Grand Cross Fire, this section is inapplicable.

Grounds for Disqualification

1. Falsification of evidence

2. Failure to produce evidence upon request

3. Switching code numbers, divisions or partners

4. Scouting or receiving advance information at the tournament of an opponent’s case.

Grounds for Forfeiture of Round

An entry will forfeit a round for failure to appear within ten minutes of the scheduled time, unless the delay is caused by the tournament itself. A forfeiture will result in a loss, a rank of 7, and 0 speaker points.

Principal Verification

1. Tournament Limits: A signed Principal Verification Form must be submitted to both district and state tournament managers to verify the number of tournaments attended.

2. Appropriate Debating: A signed Principal Approval Statement must be submitted to both district and state tournament managers to acknowledge that:

a. Argumentation advanced by debaters from the school will meet the standards of conduct of that school, and

b. Constructive speeches, rebuttals and cross examinations will be appropriate in language and action for public performance by high school students.

District Tournament Format

1. State debate qualifiers will be determined at a district tournament in the manner approved by their Board of Control.

2. No school may enter more than twelve (12) teams in the district tournament. (An LD contestant is considered a team.) No school may enter more than six (6) LD contestants, six (6) policy or six (6) public forum teams.

3. The District Board of Control may approve a “wild card” for the district debate tournament to avoid byes.

4. If there is just one school of a specific classification in a district, that school may combine with a neighboring district with approval of both districts’ Board of Control and the IHSAA. Otherwise, that school may enter a maximum of two policy teams, two public forum teams, and two LD debaters in the state tournament.

State Debate Tournament Format

1. Class A and Class B tabulation areas will be separated to the extent possible.

2. Six preliminary random rounds will be debated. Noround will be scheduled to begin later than 9:00 p.m. on the first day.

3. Contestants will debate three negative and three affirmative sides in preliminary rounds.

Pairing Priorities: Follow to the extent possible.

a. Contestants should not meet entries from own school.

b. Contestants should not meet entry previously debated.

4. Quarterfinals, semis, and finals are single elimination.

5. At the conclusion of the six preliminary rounds, a quarterfinal pairing shall be made.

a. Teams who have met in the first six rounds will reverse sides; those who have not met in the first six rounds will flip for sides

b. Brackets will be broken to avoid teammates debating each other for as long as possible. When teammates are bracketed against each other, the lower-seeded of those entries will be replaced with the next lower-seeded entry in the bracket not from the same school.

6. Tie Break Procedure:The determining factors for breaking a tie shall be 1) speaker ranking. If the tie still exists, the criteria shall be (in this order) 2) head to head, 3) opponents’ win/loss record, 4) speaker points, 5) drop high and low speaker points, 6) as many additional tie breaker calculations available in the tournament software will be used to avoid ties. In the event that a tie still exists, a coin will be flipped, with the debate commissioner and the tournament manager conducting, in order to break the tie.

7. Strike Privilege: Coaches of debaters in semis and finals will be provided with the names of the judges for those rounds, and will have the opportunity to disqualify one judge. Judges’ school and district will be available for the purpose of striking.

8. Scouting:

a. No L-D contestant shall observe another contestant at any point during the tournament.

b. No Policy or Public Forum contestant shall observe an opponent or receive advance information about an opponent’s case from a coach, judge, or other contestant.

9. Observers: Rounds at state debate are open. Exceptions: a) LD and Public Forum competitors shall not observe any rounds until they are eliminated from the tournament.

b) Anyone having a bye or forfeit shall not observe rounds during their bye/forfeit time.

10. Observers’ Affiliation: Observers must be affiliated with one of the participating entries unless prior written permission has been granted by the tournament manager.

11. Observers’ Behavior: There shall be no heckling, distractions or flowing of a debate by observers.

Judging Guidelines

1. State debate judges shall file policy and L-D philosophy statements that will be posted for examination.

2. One policy debate constitutes a judging round. Two LD debates or two Public Forum debates constitute a judging round.

3. A judge should not judge a contestant more than once.

4. Each school will be provided with a copy of their ballot.

5. The ballot is the official decision of the judge. Judges are not obligated to “defend a ballot” or answer a coach’s questions regarding a ballot decision.

6. Oral critiques are not given at state debate.

7. Judges do not disqualify contestants. Rule violations shall be reported to the tournament manager.

8. When sending names to the IHSAA for state debate, coaches must declare all schools with which the judge is affiliated and coded against.

Determining Team Champions

1. Team winners will be determined in Class A and B based on a combined total of points earned in all three disciplines.

PlacePointsPlacePoints

1st 15 3rd(two) 12

2nd 13 qtr-finalist 8

2. 3 points will be awarded for a preliminary round win.

3. Ties in team placement will be broken by:

a. Number of entries advancing into break rounds, then

b. Number of state qualifying entries.

Speech Arts – General

Classification – based on grades 9-12

Debate

Class A 1250 and over

Class B 1249 and under

Speech and Drama

Class A 800 and over

Class B 799 and under

1. Debate: Team and individuals compete by classification.

B schools may petition to compete with A schools for a two-year period. Petitions must be filed by January 1 to be considered for the current season.

2. Speech/Drama: No designated classification for individual event competition. Teams compete by classification.

3. Consistent with the classification cycle, the ISATA Executive Board will decide the A and B debate classification based on schools’ November enrollment. This decision will be made at the December meeting of the ISATA Executive Board during the first year of the classification cycle.

Eligibility

All students who participate in debate, speech and/or drama competition are subject to IHSAA eligibility rules 8-1 through 8-16, with the exception of Rule 8-4, Amateur Status.

Coaches

1. Speech Arts head coaches must be certified to teach in Idaho or have completed the ASEP Coaching Principles course or NFHS Fundamentals of Coaching course.

2. All coaches must complete a first aid and CPR course from a school district recognized provider, as outlined in IHSAA Rule 3-2.

3. All coaches (includes head, volunteer and assistant coaches of all IHSAA activities) must take the NFHS online concussion course prior to the first day of practice. Volleyball, soccer and football coaches will be allowed to complete the course before the first competition.

4. Speech Arts head coaches are required to pass the recertification test in their discipline each year prior to their district tournament. Tests will be available at online after the rules webinar, or at the annual fall ISATA conference. Schools whose coach does not certify may be fined by their district board of control.

2011-2012 State Tournaments

Drama December 2-3 Coeur d’Alene HS

Debate March 9-10 Rocky Mountain HS

Speech April 13-14 Madison HS

State Tournament Fines

Schools will be assessed fines for the following:

1. Entries that withdraw after noon on the Wednesday before State: Fine – $15.00.

2. Entries that withdraw within one hour before tournament check-in: Fine – $25.00.

3. Coach leaves the tournament before his/her judging obligation is fulfilled or does not judge required number of rounds: Fine – $100.

4. School does not bring the required number of “hired” judges: Fine – $100.

Judges

1. Age: Speech arts judges shall have been graduated from high school for at least twenty months.

2. Certification: Judges shall register, pay a required fee, attend a certification clinic and score 80% on a written test every year.

State Tournament Judging

1. Coaches are required to judge up to four rounds. They will be paid for rounds in excess of four.

2. Schools are required to bring additional “hired” judges to state tournaments. Judging fees of certified judges will be paid by IHSAA, but schools are responsible for travel expenses. Requirements:

a. Drama / Speech – one judge

b. Debate – one judge for every seven students or fraction thereof.

3. Certified judges will be assigned before non-certified judges if possible. Only certified judges will be paid by the IHSAA.

4. Novice judges must attend a non-certifying rules clinic at the state tournament site.

Reporting District-to-State Qualifiers

1. District Tournament Manager Responsibilities

a. Submit “District Manager’s Report” of state qualifiers to the IHSAA by noon Monday following the district tournament

b. Collect Principal Approval/Verification forms from qualifying schools and send to the IHSAA following the district tournament

2. Individual School Responsibilities

a. Register state qualifiers on the “Joy of Tournaments” website by 4:00 pm Tuesday following the district tournament. Failure to register may result in denial of participation at State.

b. Ensure that the district manager has a signed Principal Approval/Verification form for submission to the IHSAA.

Coding Entries

A coding system shall be for state tournaments. A numerical or letter code shall be assigned to each school and also to each entry. Sectioning/pairing will be done by codes only.

Tournament Inquiry Procedure

1. Concerns regarding possible rules violations by coaches or competitors during state tournaments must be submitted in writing to the tournament manager. The commissioner and manager will review the complaint and, if necessary, a grievance committee will be convened to consider the inquiry and determine dispensation.

2. A contestant who is found to have violated rules of an event may be disqualified.

3. Ethical misconduct at tournaments will be dealt with as outlined in the “Ethical Misconduct Procedures” form.

Ballot Review

1. Prior to advancement rounds, preliminary ballots and break results will be available for coaches to review for a period of 30 minutes. Coaches must remain in the room for the entire time. Ballots may not be taken after the review without permission of the tournament manager.

2. Concerns about preliminary results and ballots must be expressed prior to leaving the ballot review. No changes in preliminary results will be made after that time.

State Tab Rooms

Tab rooms will be staffed with representatives from each district if possible. The ISATA commissioner of that discipline will serve as head of the grievance committee.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: